World Continents and Oceans

Test on Thursday, November 6th!

world map one world map 2

In social studies, we are studying maps and world geography. We will have a test soon on world continents and oceans. Students will be expected to take a world map without words and add on the 7 continents and 4 oceans. They should be able to spell each correctly, including capital letters. The labels should, of course, be placed in the correct locations on the map!  Students will also be asked to locate and label Abbotsford on the same map. Two different practice maps can be seen above;  just enlarge on your screen.

If a student can identify and label these eleven places on a map, they will be invited to try for extra credit in an additional activity. This additional task will only be for children who already meet expectations, as listed above. In this activity, students will be given names of land forms (examples: mountain range or desert) and countries, and will be asked to identify on which continent each is located. (Please note:  If a child cannot identify the continents and oceans in the first activity (paragraph one), they cannot exceed expectations; therefore, he or she will not be working on this extra activity.

The main focus in studying must be to ensure a child first knows the 7 continents and 4 oceans, and can label a map correctly, marked on placement and spelling.

Next: We will learn about the history of place names – how different places get named. For example, it is thought that Abbotsford is named after Henry Abbott, who was the superintendent of the Canadian Pacific Railway.  Other people think that it was named after the home of a famous writer in England, Sir Walter Scott. Another example is the name Matsqui. It is an aboriginal word that means a section of ground that is higher than the surrounding area.

Clouds Help Us Predict the Weather

clouds heading

We are learning about different types of clouds! Clouds are named based on their shape and their level in the sky. We are practicing identifying clouds in class.  By identifying clouds by name, we can report on our observations in a clear manner, and can use the types to predict upcoming weather.

A fun site for practicing cloud names is The Cloud Appreciation Society. Make sure you read the names of the cloud types too! If you use the button bar on the side, you can learn more about cloud names. When you are studying cloud types, click “classic example” on the bottom.

This site has an interesting chart comparing the heights of clouds. Try this link: How high are clouds?

the height of clouds

Weaver Creek Field Trip

Have you ever  been to Weaver Creek Spawning Channels?  We went to Weaver Creek on a field trip. We saw A LOT of fish, even some dead fish. We learned that sockeye and chum come to Weaver Creek every year. It is interesting to see how the fish can jump up the fish ladders. Some fish went up a slide! They allow only a certain number of fish to go through each day. Today, they let 531 salmon through. There were some seagulls eating dead fish.

wcccca3

Click here to see a video: Weaver Creek

Click here to see more photos.

We recommend that you go to see the spawning channels at Weaver Creek too!

Exploring the Colour Wheel

In class this week, we used three colours of food colouring in glasses of water. We mixed two primary colours together to make a secondary colour. We tried this a few times and tried different amounts of red, blue and yellow. We created some fabulous colours!

photo water colour wheelStudents are creating a colour wheel to keep in their notebooks.color wheel image

We watched fun videos about colour too:

Crayola Doesn’t Make a Color For Your Eyes 

There Are Three Primary Colors

Colour Wheel.

 

Water in the Air

We are studying weather in class this term. Today, we looked at two glasses of water – one with room temperature water and the other with ice water. After a few minutes, we compared the two glasses.

September 2014 009The glass with ice water felt cold and wet. Did the glass leak water through its sides?  No! We learned that there is water vapour in the air. When the water vapour touches the glass, it condenses into droplets. We call that condensation.

Can you think of other times when you see condensation?

 

Homework Routines and Policies

Homework:

Math is often the work that was assigned and worked on in class, but that was not finished. Students are asked to write down in their planner that there was math homework, but if they finished it in class, they can put a check mark beside it in their planner.

Sometimes, there is science, social studies or writing homework. If it is a large project, I will give lots of notice and time to work on it.

Every night, students are expected to read for 20 minutes or more. Students can read books from home or may bring home two library books.

Students have a spelling pretest on Monday mornings. They are expected to practice the week’s list each night, including some days where they print the words as part of their practice. Our lists are available on-line, at SpellingCity.   Spelling tests are on the last day of the week (usually Fridays). The tests will be marked over the weekend and sent home on Mondays.

Homework Policy:

If a child does not have their homework here or it is not done, the following steps will be followed. The teacher will also place a note in the planner for the parent.

First day in the week:  Stay in a recess until it is done. If it is not done at the end of recess, the child may be asked to stay in a lunch to work on it as well. If the student left the page at home, they may be asked to redo the page or part of it.

Second time that same week:  Stay in both recess and lunch to work on the homework. When that work is done, read.

Third time in the week:The student will stay in at recess and lunch, to complete the homework, then read. The teacher will contact the parent or guardian to discuss a detention time. A child will not be kept after school without notifying a parent or guardian.

During the music unit: When a child has taken their recorder home, and left it at home when it is needed at school, the child will have the same consequences as if they had forgotten their homework (stay in at recess and read).

Allergies in our class

In our classroom, the teacher is allergic to citrus fruits like oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruit. This allergy is activated by airborne citrus – this means she reacts when the smell of citrus is in the air. Please do not bring oranges or other citrus fruits to class.  Pineapple is not in the same family, so pineapple is okay to have in class. Juice boxes are permitted, as the juice is sealed inside.  Students are asked to cut open the top of the juice box and rinse it with water before putting it in the recycling bucket.

No citrus photo